Map of Battle of Vyazma 1812.
Napoleon's Invasion of Russia.

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" (...) we reached Vyazma, a large and pleasant city situated at the source of
the River Oka which is a tributary which flows into the Volga at Novgorod."
- Louis Joseph Vionnet, France

"Moscow was as famous for its brides as Vyazma for its gingerbread (...)"
- T.J. Binyon

Napoleon in Russia "On October 31, Napoleon reached Vyazma. For the first time since leaving Moscow he wore a sable cap, a green pelisse edged with sable, and slashed with gold frogs, and fur-lined boots.
He continued to wear this costume during the rest of the retreat, and when the severe frosts began, and it was impossible to sit in the saddle, he either drove in a carriage, or went on foot. (...)"
The battle of Vyazma was most disastrous to the French, Miloradovich took a number of prisoners, artillery and baggage. Napoleon, however, informed France of the loss of a few individuals who had been captured by the Cossacks (...)"
- Vasilii V. Vereshchagin, Russia

"Miloradovich began the attack on Davout with his cavalry on the morning of the 3rd November, when Ney was just south of Vyazma; the Viceroy Eugene and Poniatowski, were nearing that place, and Davout, followed by Platov's Cossacks, was approaching Fedorovskoye. But Davout, although weak in guns and cavalry, and suffering heavy loss, beat off his assailants and continued his retreat.
At 10 o'clock the Russian infantry came up, and attacked the French flank (...)"
- Reginald George Burton

"Affair at Vyazma would have spared us much difficulty, but we could not yet accept such an extreme measure. Finally, on November 3, General Miloradovich brought his troops to the highway about a league from Vyazma, and fiercely attacked ... "
- M. De Fezensac, France

"During the retreat the (Old) Guard cleaned out the supply depots that (General) Teste had organized with great pains at Vyazma, leaving nothing for the convoy of wounded following them."
- Colonel John Elting, USA

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Marshal Louis Davout.
Davout "His prodigious talent for war along with his reputation as a stern disciplinarian, earned him the title The Iron Marshal. (...) Within the army and among his social peers, he was often considered cold and distant; while respected, he was not well-liked. During times of peace, he preferred to spend time with his family and care for his home, rather than cultivate his high social standing. (...) He was regarded by his contemporaries as one of the ablest of Napoleon's marshals. He was one of the few commanders during the Napoleonic Wars who was never defeated on the field." - wikipedia
"(...) his troops were the best trained, disciplined, and cared for in the Grande Armee. He was strict with his subordinates, stricter with himself, incorruptible, and merciless toward looters of any grade. If necessary, he would strip a province to feed his men; otherwise his soldiers dared not to touch a stray chicken. Ordinarily cool and methodical (...) He was respected, feared, and obeyed, - even by Vandamme - but he lacked the magnetism of Murat and Ney. (...) He was never defeated." - Colonel John Elting

Miloradovich General Miloradovich.
Count Mikhail A. Miloradovich was a Russian general of Serbian origin. He participated in numerous campaigns: the Italian and Swiss expedition (1799-1800), Austerlitz Campaign (1805), Russo-Turkish War (18061812), Napoleon's Invasion of Russia (1812), German Campaign (1813), and the Campaign in France (1814). Miloradovich concluded his last campaign, in Paris.
His reputation as a daring commander (referred to as "the Russian Murat") rivalled that of his bitter personal enemy, Russian famous general, Bagration. Miloradovich also had a reputation for being lucky. He boasted that he had fought fifty battles but had never been wounded !
After the Treaty of Fontainebleau in 1814, Tzar Alexander appointed Miloradovich commander of the Russian Imperial Guard. In 1818 Miloradovich became Governor of Saint Petersburg, the imperial capital. "The private life of Miloradovich, who never married and had no offspring, has been a controversial subject. Contemporaries condemned him for a desire to create his own harem in the theatre school (...) . According to these sources, Miloradovich "had a weakness for women" (...) - wikipedia

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Napoleon, His Army and Enemies